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Gift etiquette

When it comes to getting married these days, many people already have their home set up. This can make it difficult to buy gifts for couples who seem ‘to have everything’.
Often couples pay for weddings themselves, so the idea of money for a honeymoon, down-payment on a house or simply some extra cash may appeal.
But what is the polite way to advise guests of your preference? Definitely not on the invitation – this is simply a way to let your friends and family know you want them to attend your special occasion and to book the date. After guests accept and confirm, they will most likely contact someone in the wedding party to ask about the gifts.
Guests typically spend an average of $85 to $125 on a wedding gift. So if you do go for a register, be courteous and choose a range of price options, including inexpensive items for younger friends and relatives.
Remember, some people will not like the idea of a gift registry or gifting money. Whatever happens – don’t even think of giving out a bank account number … that is the queen of tacky.
Just be prepared and be grateful, whatever the outcome, which means taking the time out to send a thank you note, which can be done at home, using printers or with pre-bought stationery.

Gift giving options:

Guests choose – the old fashioned way, it’s pot luck and a lovely surprise
Wedding register – a list of wedding gifts at a particular store or stores. Friends and family access this ‘wish list’ either online or in-store. Once an item is purchased, the list is updated showing what is still available. Be aware, some online registries charge a fee
Money tree or wishing well – people usually bring a card and this is attached to the money tree or popped into the wishing well at the venue. People may balk at this – particularly your older guests, so have some gift ideas up your sleeve to tell them (and a table with space for actual gifts)